What the Latest Mueller Indictment Reveals About WikiLeaks’ Ties to Russia—and What It Doesn’t

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Raffi Khatchadourian, excerpts:

The over-all picture that the indictment offers of the “WikiLeaks connection,” as Clapper once put it, is entirely consistent with previous intelligence assessments, which said that the G.R.U. provided Julian Assange, the editor of WikiLeaks, with the D.N.C. and Podesta archives. But, at the level of evidence, the indictment offers a strange mix: tantalizing, fragmentary new details that suggest the when and how without quite revealing everything that happened.

Indictments are not the same as intelligence reports. They are sometimes intentionally written ambiguously, to give prosecutors flexibility in the way they decide to prove their case—emphasizing the strongest links in an argument while implying a bigger picture. It is likely that the charged G.R.U. officers will never face trial, but Mueller may still want to retain flexibility, given that his investigation is ongoing.

(…) So did the G.R.U. use the Guccifer 2.0 persona to relay e-mails to WikiLeaks in the summer of 2016? Or did it provide them to Assange by some other means much earlier, in the spring?

(…) In other words, both the G.R.U. and Assange appear to have confessed to the transmission and reception of a large trove of Clinton-related e-mails in mid-June, before Guccifer 2.0 was apparently created.

https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/what-the-latest-mueller-indictment-reveals-about-wikileaks-ties-to-russia-and-what-it-doesnt


The indictment may only be an accusation, but it hints at the remarkably granular forensic intelligence that has been gathered.

Source: What the Latest Mueller Indictment Reveals About WikiLeaks’ Ties to Russia—and What It Doesn’t

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